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Employment Law News


The 'Fair Use' Rule: When Use of Copyrighted Material is Acceptable
In some situations, you may make limited use of another's copyrighted work without asking permission or infringing on the original copyright.

What Small Business Owners Should Understand About Liability
As a business owner, you want to protect yourself and understand the basics about business risk and personal liability.

Executive Orders: The Employment Transformers for Federal Contractors
A new Executive Order by President Obama provides that, as of January 1, 2017, all employees of federal contractors and subcontractors will accrue at least one hour of paid sick leave for each 30 hours worked with a minimum of 56 hours per year.

Why Checking a Potential Employee's Background Is Legally Tricky
Although vetting potential employees is important in terms of safety as well as job performance, there are legal limitations on how much digging potential employers can do. Taking into account an arrest, as opposed to a conviction, for example, is illegal in many states. Furthermore, uncovering personal information about an individual may lead to future discrimination lawsuits based on sexual orientation, gender identification, or a background of whistle blowing or complaint.

UPS Hit with Lawsuit for Beard Ban
The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has filed a lawsuit against UPS for a company-wide policy which prohibits a customer-facing employee from having a beard, even if he requests an exception on religious grounds. According to federal authorities, this ban violates the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

NYC Strictly Limits Employers from Using Credit Checks in Employment Decisions and Mandates Increased Use of Secret Testers in Employment and Housing Discrimination Investigations
New York City employers and employment agencies are now prohibited from using a credit check in employment situations and from using the results of the credit check to discriminate against the potential or current employee.

Forever 21 Sued for Harassing Transgender Worker
An employee at a Brooklyn location of the Forever 21 retail chain claims discrimination and harassment by supervisors based on gender identity.

Boy Scouts of America Reminded About New York's Discrimination Laws
New York's Attorney General's Office wrote to the Boy Scouts of America seeking various documents including any about hiring decisions based on sexual orientation. The letter made clear that New York state and city laws prohibit such employment discrimination.

Revlon Settles Discrimination Lawsuit By Former Employee
A former chief scientific officer at Revlon settled his lawsuit for retaliation and discrimination. His claims of anti-Semitic, racial and anti-American comments by the company's CEO went viral on Twitter earlier this year.

TGI Friday's Facing Class Action Discrimination Suit
A group of African-American employees allege they were replaced with lighter-skinned employees after a Manhattan TGI Friday's moved locations.

Labor Dispute Brewing at West Village's Printing House
Workers at the million dollar Printing House apartments in West Village are mounting allegations of wage and overtime law violations.

Restaurant Fined $5,000 for 'Sexist' Ad Seeking a 'Hostess'
Sistina, an Italian restaurant in New York City has been fined over a post on craigslist.com advertising a position for a hostess after a sting operation uncovered that only an email coming from a woman was opened.

Jay Z, Kanye West Sued for Copyright Infringement, Accused in Federal Lawsuit of ‘Stealing’ Song Made in America
Hip hop artist Joel Mac is claiming that Jay Z, Kanye West and Frank Ocean stole on of their hit songs from him. Allegedly, the artists were exposed to Mac's song of the same name after he sold a CD to one of their producers while they were recording.

Why Living Wage Laws Are Riddled With Holes
After NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio signed an executive order instituting a living wage law, some critics say it will not help many workers.

The 2010 Song "Loca" Came Without Proper Authorization From a Dominican Republic Songwriter
A Shakira song was the subject of a Federal copyright infringement suit brought in New York. The judge held that the song was very similar to one written by the plaintiff and that a Sony Music subsidiary was responsible for the infringement.

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Employment Law News



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